Posts tagged women

fyeahafrica:

Mary Sibande is a young South African artist born in 1982. Through paintings and sculpture, she explores the construction of identity in a post-colonial context, in South Africa, and also criticizes stereotypes of black women.
baobabavenue:

‘they don’t make them like they used to’ par Mary Sibande 
Mary Sibande jeune artiste sud-africaine née en 1982. À travers la peinture et la sculpture, elle explore la construction de l’identité dans un contexte post-colonial en Afrique du Sud, mais aussi critique les représentations stéréotypées de la femme noire.

fyeahafrica:

Mary Sibande is a young South African artist born in 1982. Through paintings and sculpture, she explores the construction of identity in a post-colonial context, in South Africa, and also criticizes stereotypes of black women.

baobabavenue:

‘they don’t make them like they used to’ par Mary Sibande

Mary Sibande jeune artiste sud-africaine née en 1982. À travers la peinture et la sculpture, elle explore la construction de l’identité dans un contexte post-colonial en Afrique du Sud, mais aussi critique les représentations stéréotypées de la femme noire.

(Source: baobabavenue)

806 notes

I am woman, I am strong and I do what I want.
My mind is just as much mine as is my body
My heart is just as much mine as are my choices.
My life is just as much mine as yours is yours.

And simply because of that… we have a problem.

Ghadeer M. 2011. “A Rant. Ya Si Sayed”, in: Jessica Yee (Ed.). Feminism for Real. Deconstructing the Academic Industrial Complex of Feminism, p. 72.

To anyone interested in literature - a good reading list to start exploring African women’s writing. I specially recommend Adichie and Dangarembga.

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pak-socioeconomy:

“…all the women in the country who are working for change. Do not give up as this is your dream”
—Sharmeen Chinoy (Oscar Acceptance Speech 26 Feb 2012)

pak-socioeconomy:

…all the women in the country who are working for change. Do not give up as this is your dream

—Sharmeen Chinoy (Oscar Acceptance Speech 26 Feb 2012)

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guardiancomment:

To celebrate International Women’s Day, we asked 11 women from different countries to choose one reason we should celebrate this year.

• From the US: Jessica Valenti - let’s celebrate the backlash against sexism

• From Egypt: Adhaf Souef - let’s celebrate the women of Egypt’s revolution

• From India: Mari Marcel Thekaekara - let’s celebrate Indian women being more visible than ever

• From Sudan: Lubna Hussein - let’s celebrate the women of Sudan’s Nuba mountains

• From China: Lijia Zhan - let’s celebrate China leading the world in wealthy self-made women

• From Afghanistan: Orzala Ashraf Nemat - let’s celebrate Afghanistan’s grassroots activists

• From Norway: Maria Reinertsen - let’s celebrate more dad time for kids in Norway

• From Chile: Catalina May - let’s celebrate a belated discission about women’s rights in Chile

• From the UK: Anna Bird - let’s celebrate a new energy among UK feminist activists

• From Russia: Natalia Antonova - let’s celebrate women taking on the government

• From Saudi Arabia: Eman Al Nafjan - let’s celebrate the Saudi women’s driving campaign

Photographs: Reuters; Phil Moore for the Guardian; Manish Swarup/AP; AP; Janine Wiedel/Alam; AFP/Getty Images; David Wong/AP; AP

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This is Lady Pink, one of the only female graffiti artists active in the ’80s. Jenny Holzer, famous for her feminist postmodern “Truisms,” designed this shirt and Lady Pink wore it around NYC. 

This is Lady Pink, one of the only female graffiti artists active in the ’80s. Jenny Holzer, famous for her feminist postmodern “Truisms,” designed this shirt and Lady Pink wore it around NYC. 

(Source: deathatitsfinest)

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fyeahafrica:

Student hairstyles of the seventies, Congo 

 photographs by Eliot Elisofon

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dynamicafrica:

African Women Filmmakers Tell Their Stories

Documentary filmmaking holds a special place in the history of African women’s cinema. In 1972, Senegalese filmmaker Safi Faye became the first sub-Saharan African woman to make a commercially distributed feature film when she directed “Kaddu Beykat”. The film, a mixture of fiction and documentary, depicts the economic problems suffered by Senegalese village farmers because of agriculture policies that Faye says rely on an outdated, colonial system of groundnut monoculture. Faye would go on to direct several documentaries often focused on rural life in her native Senegal.

African women who have taken documentary filmmaking to new levels come from across the continent and handle a wide range of topics. The films show an Africa that is not often seen, according to Beti Ellerson, director of the Center for the Study and Research of African Women in Cinema. Ellerson, who teaches courses in African studies, visual culture and women studies in the Washington, DC, area, is also the producer of a 2002 documentary, “Sisters of the Screen: African Women in the Cinema.”

Much has changed since Faye’s early Senegalese films. The emergence of the Internet, social media and crowd-funding platforms such as Kickstarter now offer a new generation of African women documentary filmmakers the tools to realize their visions. To learn of the challenges and opportunities facing African women filmmakers, AllAfrica’s Genet Lakew and Rahwa Meharena asked three women - Salem Mekuria, Rahel Zegeye and Sosena Solomon (pictured above) - to share their stories. They represent two generations of Ethiopian documentary filmmaking.


(cont. reading)

(Source: )

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